Dictée Question

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12 thoughts on “Dictée Question”

  1. Dictations are the one assignment that I mark up. I circle or underline where a student didn’t copy correctly. I indicate where a student didn’t try to write their version before copying mine.

    I mark up one of the first few dictations we do in the year and hand them back. From then on I don’t need to mark them up so much. Hardly ever. Students figure I’m looking at them since I did it that one time.

    1. Yeah anything we can do at the beginning of the year sets the tone for the rest of the year. I find that if I am strict and work hard in September and October I can coast on that steam later. Except that it’s 98 degrees in Portland next week. I’ll take them to the lab cause my room faces west and no ac – we will go set up our Sr. Wooly accounts.

  2. If I needed marks on it…

    I would have them fold over the top portion with their name. I would then collect it and then distribute them in a random order. Then I would project the correct sentence then have them mark it with a RED pen the correction…. Since this is a focus on form, I do not do it.

    I have them do a dictation then if I had to put a grade, I make it credit/no credit. For level 1 I would never have them be corrected. They need the auditory input. Their writing for me 1) Tells me Where they are/What can they do 2) See what is retained from the lesson or “unit”/story and 3) for my Mental Health/bail out move.

    1. Greg, I do as little grading as possible. Seriously. Chicago Public Schools require teachers to put in 2 grades per week. That’s just enough to make us burnt out. If you look around, you’ll see that teachers over 40 years old in Chicago are becoming a rare breed.

      1. I’m sure what my district or school policy is Sean. My admin once asked me if my grades reflected the learning involved in my class. He noticed that many were the same… many As. Without thinking, I started adding some exit slips but man does that take work. The thing is at my school, I have so many students keeping a steady eye on their grades… let’s not forget the parents. I will just give everyone credit to keep the grade book looking good.

        1. Are you using 65% as the Interpersonal Skill? If you enforce it, you can give lots of B’s. So you have A’s, B’s and C’s and the bosses won’t freak out so bad. They only look in the book early, mostly. We have to keep the cover up for awhile until a certain point when they stop looking. Many teachers give all A’s but I feel we must differentiate. Can you give D’s to the jerks who don’t listen and then A through C for the others? You don’t have to mess w the 35% smaller grades if you do that, just nuance the Interpersonal Skill grade more.

        2. Playing the Gradebook game brings out the used car salesman in all of us. Every school is different in what kinda grades they’re looking for.

          That question your admin asked, Steven, “Do your grades reflect the learning that is happening?” is one that makes them sound almighty. Really. Why ask that question if you don’t intend to dedicate time and open your ears to have a discussion about it. Admin will never have that kind of time to spend with foreign language teachers. Perhaps nor with any teacher.

    2. We grade them in class before leaving. Hey it’s just more reps. I toss all the quick quizzes with perfect scores, in the recycle bin. That’s usually 95% of the papers. Then I fill the gradebook column with 100% and then just change the ones that didn’t get a perfect score of who were absent.
      I get away with doing only quick quizzes by changing the name. Exit Ticket. Formative Listening Assessment. Quick Quiz. Comprehension Quiz. Many names. Same activity.

  3. Do quick quizzes. I had stopped bc the kids knew all the answers, but now I see that not only does the grade book need to be fed, so do the kids, bc they tell parents and parents tell admins, and we always must keep up the illusion of testing in the way all those looking at our programs see testing, as an important part of school. I do remember my own first test in English. I was 8 months old. Made me nervous, but I passed. Some adult asked me if I knew what phenomenological meant. But I got the other nine questions right. I was very good even then at dredging up words I had absorbed into my unconscious. I still don’t know what phenomenological means.

  4. If I ever have an administrator in my room, I pass out red pens and have students make corrections to their dictations, adding accent marks and correcting misspells. Admins love that stuff. They get to click on so many boxes.

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