Summer is Here!

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben's Patreon at $10 or more
Already a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to access this content.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

9 thoughts on “Summer is Here!”

  1. HELP!

    Sorry to hijack. I would really like to rest! But just got this note from guidance:

    “Are you able to give xxx a test/work to earn prior Spanish credit as he is at Spanish 4 as a freshmen? We are looking to provide him the credit before the end of this year.”

    I had a student in the fall –9th grade–in Spanish 1 but fluent bc he learned on his own + had a good middle school program + traveled to the DR with his church. I moved him directly into “Sp 4” but even in that group he was well above the level of all students except for the German exchange student.

    Anyway, they want me to give him a test (? or something ) because he only has one HS Spanish credit. I think I may be able to get out of the testing aspect and just write up / sign something to grant him HS credit retroactively???

    It’s only an issue because the kid will be eligible for some scholarship but he doesnt have 2 HS language credits, and well there is no more Spanish here at FHS.

    Suggestions for something easy and official-sounding that involves me doing nothing or almost nothing?

    Thank you!!!

  2. Hi Jen,

    Sorry I didn’t see your question earlier. Here are a couple of ideas for you.

    1) Can the school simply give him “equivalent credit”? Here in California, if a student takes and passes a Language 3 or 4 course, they are considered to have passed all prior courses. It doesn’t show up on their transcript that way, but California universities, scholarship award organizations, etc. recognize this as equivalent. For example, UC and CSU require two years of a foreign language and recommend three for entrance. However, if a freshman successfully completes a Language 4 or AP course as a freshman, the requirement is fulfilled. Any chance that something like that recognition could be provided by your school or district?

    2) Has this student been in your class? From the nature of the question, I gather this is the case but want to make certain. If this student has been in your Spanish 4 class for the entire year, you have done all of the assessment needed to make a determination. In that case, with explicit informed (and written) consent of your administration, write up a statement that this student has completed all course requirements for Spanish 3 (or 2 and 3, or 1, 2, and 3 – whatever they think is needed.

    3) What if this amazing kid wants to continue taking Spanish anyway? Could your school create a course like Spanish: Independent Studies just for him? He could work with you next year to get his needed credit.

    To me, option 1 would be the best, but it might mean a wholesale re-thinking of the nature of language requirements on the part of not only your school but the district and even the state. There is, however, precedence for it. As I noted, California already recognizes that if a student is able to perform well in Language 4, that student has already met all of the requirements for the prerequisite courses and should not be hindered by not having completed a certain number of seat hours.

    In any case, you need to be certain that you have written authorization from your administration for this. Any affidavit or certificate should simply state that the student has successfully completed all of the requirements for the prior course or courses. The awarding of credit is the domain of the administration and guidance; you are merely attesting to the student’s competence in the language.

    If I think of anything else, I’ll post again.

    1. If you are looking for specific wording, I would write something like the following:

      I hereby certify that [Student Name and Identification Number] has successfully met all of the requirements for the courses Spanish 1, Spanish 2, and Spanish 3.

      Oh, here’s another idea:

      Check with administration, but perhaps you could write something like this:

      I hereby certify that [Student Name and Identification Number] has successfully met all of the requirements for the courses Spanish 1, Spanish 2, and Spanish 3. He has done so through a combination of formal and informal instruction, independent study, and life experience in a Spanish-speaking environment (Dominican Republic). [Student Name] has demonstrated his competence and ability at the Intermediate Mid/High level on the ACTFL scale of Language Proficiency. I recommend that [Student Name] be awarded corresponding recognition on his official high school transcript.

      Of course, feel free to edit and adapt any of this for the actual situation.

      1. Anytime we’re in a pinch and don’t know how to articulate ideas in a difficult situation, Robert appears. Is there like a bat signal or Spidey-Sense or something that indicates when teachers are in distress? You are amazing, Mr. Chevalier.

    2. The one thing that you must keep absolutely clear is that you are providing a professional opinion about your students’ abilities at the request of your administration. It is the administration that decides if he gets the high school credits or not.

      This is CYA advice – if there is ever a question later, you simply rendered a professional opinion and made a recommendation without knowing the legalities of awarding credits. That is the responsibility of administration.

      In California, at least, high schools can award high school credit for work done outside of the high school setting. Students who do work at a community college, for example, can arrange for that to count as high school credit as well. The Concordia Language Villages in the summer award high school credit, and school districts can accept that as transfer credit. I imagine that your school and district can do all of this legally, but you want to be certain that they are the ones who bear the liability, not you.

  3. THANK YOU ROBERT!

    I had the same idea re: credit is awarded by admin & I’m providing professional opinion.

    Just 2 days ago as I was looking at another school’s program of studies I saw that they grant HS credit to 8th graders who complete “Spanish 1A” or whatever so in addition to the “certificate” wording you provide, I’ll also include the text from that school since it is a local example.

    Originally when they contacted me about this I misinterpreted and thought they wanted me to provide him with further study, which of course is a no brainer and I responded immediately with 3 different ways to make that happen (this is all prior to my position and hence the whole program being cut). But then they specified and asked for proof that he completed the prior requirements.

    Thanks Ben for intervening so I saw this!!!

  4. You’re welcome, Jen.

    If it helps at all, I have had students do a year abroad as part of their high school experience. A couple of students went with American Field Service, and a couple of brothers went (in different years) with US Congress – German Parliament Youth Exchange. Each time my school district worked with them to identify how the work they did in Germany could be awarded high school credit so that they could graduate from high school on schedule.

    So, I think a lot of this depends on your school and district’s desire to see it happen. They are, after all, the ones who actually award the credits.

    Have a great weekend!

Leave a Comment

  • Search

Get The Latest Updates

Subscribe to Our Mailing List

No spam, notifications only about new products, updates.

Related Posts

The Problem with CI

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

CI and the Research (cont.)

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

Research Question

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

We Have the Research

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

$10

~PER MONTH

Subscribe to be a patron and get additional posts by Ben, along with live-streams, and monthly patron meetings!

Also each month, you will get a special coupon code to save 20% on any product once a month.

  • 20% coupon to anything in the store once a month
  • Access to monthly meetings with Ben
  • Access to exclusive Patreon posts by Ben
  • Access to livestreams by Ben