Rules and Expectations Part 2a : Getting Their Attention

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7 thoughts on “Rules and Expectations Part 2a : Getting Their Attention”

  1. As always, Laurie, you speak with wisdom. Your sneeze is great! I count down from 5 to 0 in French and even though I’ve never actually “told” my students what I expect when I do this, they get it. Granted, 11 year olds are closer to kindergarten than HS students, where this kind of signal is very common. But it works. They stop talking and look at me. And I don’t go insane yelling at them. Sometimes I try the “powered by silence” method, where I just stand there and wait for them to close their traps, but this often just makes me and some of the other kids just as frustrated. I agree that noise is a good thing. I like my counting,

  2. Annemarie Orth

    I’ve definitely struggled with the attention getting signal. I visited a school in Colorado (Odyssey School in Denver) which used a call and response system in all classrooms and it worked beautifully (it sounded like “Ahgo-ah-me” in an African language-no one was able to tell me what it meant) Does anyone else have an effective call and response attention getting signal? I realize that it’s an individual thing. I was just thinking about this today as I struggled to get my chatty 7th graders’ attention, so I appreciate this post, Laurie.

    1. A greeting used in Arabic-speaking countries: “Salaam alaikum” = Peace be with you. Response: “Alaikum salaam” = And also with you. Used throughout French-speaking West and North Africa, as well as the Middle East.

  3. Nose goes. I’m not even sure why I did it but one day I touched my nose just like the kids do when they say “Nose goes.” I got total silence in about 5-10 seconds and all eyes on me.

  4. I often start class with a song…always, in my beginning class. By the time we’re done, everyone is paying attention. I also use songs to transition between activities if the kids are not focused. By the time students know a poem or two, we can recite those and the class unites. It’s worth teaching the songs for a number of reasons. I usually use short children’s songs in the first year, only those that I can sing myself comfortably.

  5. I love you guys! I am just beginning my school day and I already have more good ideas than I can handle! Where else could you get such candor, intelligence and good will? Behind every goodTPRS/CI practitioner, there is a dedicated blog community!

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