The Din is a Bee Hive

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5 thoughts on “The Din is a Bee Hive”

  1. The question of how long a word sticks with you between doses of input is going to depend on the word. But in general, there is a decline with any word, whether being studied to be learned or being received amidst CI.
    Space between repetitions was essential to the Pimsleur method – graduated interval recall. From Wikipedia: “The intervals published in Pimsleur’s paper were: 5 seconds, 25 seconds, 2 minutes, 10 minutes, 1 hour, 5 hours, 1 day, 5 days, 25 days, 4 months, and 2 years.”
    Paul Nation says that if too much time passes between repetitions, then the subsequent repetition is like starting over, like getting the first repetition all over again.
    A daily dose, even if less per day, is preferable.
    Check out Chart 3: https://casls.uoregon.edu/pdfs/tenquestions/TBQK8Programs.pdf

    1. …Paul Nation says that if too much time passes between repetitions, then the subsequent repetition is like starting over, like getting the first repetition all over again….
      That is a huge piece of information and thank you Eric. This supports what we do when we only target two or three verbs per class. By trying to repeat one or more targets in every single sentence we say, we stay completely inbounds and we don’t let too much time, like maybe 20 seconds or so, pass by between each rep. I knew it was important to do it that way, and now I know why.

    2. Pimsleur French worked for me… after 8 years I am still able to say quite a bit of what I was learning. No, I was acquiring it. Otherwise I would have forgotten it by now. Actually, if there was any talk of rules and such, I don’t remember them, so the acquisition may be all that stuck with me. Es que vous voudria mange kelkeshores avec moi? Ou e le boulvar? Que le hors et il?
      Re block classes, I can’t imagine this is too great of a factor to even worry about. Plus, there’s the give and take, because in the shorter classes you may not be getting as many of the initial time intervals (e.g. 1 hour) if his optimal interval suggestion is accurate. And some block classes work on an everyday-for-one-semester-equals-a-year basis. Mine does. I won’t see my students here at my school now again for 12 whole months. I’ve done this a few times in past years. I haven’t been too scientific about it, but the losses I see after those 12 months are often trivial if even noticeable, and we’re back up to speed in no time. The best thing about it for me is the lessening of quotidian group routines, which for me can surely be wearing.

      1. Jim I think that is called omniscient learning. You are back up to speed with them in no time because you taught directly to the part of their brains that learns languages. You put the information there. It slept there, churned around omnisciently without any more input, but was easily awoken because it had first been authentically acquired.
        Omniscient learning is cool. I once took a few years away from the violin, decades ago, and when I picked it back up, after dumping some of the rust off of my left hand, was playing actually better than when I stopped. My deeper mind had been practicing the violin for those two years without my knowing it.
        That is so different from what happens when teachers teach to the conscious minds of their students, making everything analytical. Doing that is an insult to the majesty of the design of the human brain. Kids taught by memorization and sematic sets, etc. retain very little.
        I inherited a fourth year AP class once that new absolutely no French. Half way through the year my first year students were much stronger, because those AP kids were so confused. And they never did get on board with stories even though I spent a fortune on donuts that year.
        I think Nation’s point about not letting too much time go by without getting another rep on a target is something you did anyway, and that is why your class was up to speed so fast. You taught for acquisition.
        Pimsleur worked for you, by the way, because you are a language machine. Not everyone is.

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