Talking With Administrators

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8 thoughts on “Talking With Administrators”

  1. I know this is from a long time ago but I tried to find Susan Gross’ checklist for observer handout and the link didn’t work. I know I have seen it before but I’m not sure if it was on the PLC page or somewhere else. I was wanting to print it out for when I’m observed and to also use as a checklist for me. Anyone know where it is? or have the link?

  2. Erica here it is, pasted from TPRS in a Year! I’m not sure it is on the site so I will send it to Trevor today and ask him to add it to the TPRS Resources page as well, so people can find it more easily.
    I do have one question for the group. Should we reword this sentence from the checklist? –
    …The teacher speaks the target language: 50%, 75%, or 90% of the time, depending on the activities that day….
    Here is the checklist with a short introduction from TPRS in a Year! –
    Whenever I get observed by an administrator, I hand them a copy of it and say, “Oh, I am glad you are here. Maybe you can help me see if I am doing some of the things on this list. It would be a great help. Thanks!”
    This immediately puts you and the administrator on the same side of the ball, which is where you should be, trying to get to best practice. This checklist always works and has been a strong advocate with administrators for years. Go make your copy of this list now!
    Administrator Checklist for Observing a TPRS Classroom by Susan Gross
    The teacher demonstrates enthusiasm:
    for the language and its culture
    for the students as a group and individually
    for teaching
    The teacher checks for comprehension:
    by asking individuals
    by carefully observing all students in class
    by listening for responses from the whole class
    by asking for translation
    The teacher offers opportunity for sophisticated language use:
    by embellishing the basic statements
    by asking a variety of questions in a variety of formats
    The teacher raises the level of student’s attention:
    by involving students in the narration
    by allowing student input to direct a portion of the lesson
    by talking to one or two individual students
    by talking about one or two specific students
    by referring to places/locations/people of interest to the students
    The teacher models pro-active classroom management:
    by remaining clam and in control
    by showing genuine interest in the students
    by taking time to listen to student suggestions
    by looking at individual students with a calm demeanor
    by moving close to possible disruptions
    by offering choices to students who fail to co-operate
    by using facial expressions that are appropriate to the situation (smiling, not angry, blank expression)
    The teacher speaks the target language: 50%, 75%, or 90% of the time, depending on the activities that day.
    Students are actively engaged in the lesson:
    by acting
    by responding to questions
    by contributing ideas to the lesson
    The students are held accountable for the lesson:
    by speaking the language when asked
    by helping each other
    by unannounced quizzes
    by retelling the story line in own words
    by translating when asked
    The teacher promotes grammatical accuracy:
    by explaining the meaning of unfamiliar or new items
    by using the unfamiliar or new items multiple times, in different contexts
    by asking students to predict correct grammatical usage
    by requiring increased accuracy throughout the year
    The teacher demonstrates appropriate correction techniques:
    by modeling accuracy: rewording the student’s attempt while acknowledging the content of the student’s statement
    by demonstrating the value of accuracy: stating the meaning of the inaccurate construction
    by inviting the student to correct him/herself
    The teacher promotes higher-level thinking skills:
    by asking students to synthesize the language in a story retell
    by asking students to create imaginative situations
    by asking students to supply motivation for actions in the story
    The teacher tailors the tasks to individual student abilities:
    by asking many types of questions
    by expecting multiple levels of answers to questions (on-word, phrase, sentence)
    by requiring longer, more detailed, and more accurate narration from the most able students
    Thanks to Susan Gross for this list! For a free downloadable/printable version go to http://www.benslavic.com and click on the TPRS Resources hard link.

    1. This is awesome, thanks for the repost. 90% is a good #. If it’s C.I., and discipline is good and so is rapport with kids, no reason for more English.
      Or you could change it to something like “teacher uses T.L. over 90% of time when not dealing with management or logistical issues” maybe.
      Chris

  3. Some of us have tweaked the Checklist. I needed something that would fit on a single side of a sheet of paper. I also changed the first item to the ACTFL standard: Teacher speaks the target language at least 90% of the time yes no. I also include rigor and relevance as statements on the checklist.
    Ben, I’ll send you a copy of my checklist, just in case you want to add it to the documents available. I know others have their own versions.

  4. Thank you for this. I will be giving it (or a slightly tweaked version) to an administrator the next time he or she pops in. It’ll make their observations more useful to me and probably more meaningful to them. So far I’ve had only positive feedback when they come in; I think they are just fascinated. They don’t have a clue about what I am doing, really.
    It’s good for me to just look over the list, too, and do a little self-assessment. Thanks for reposting. I would be interested in seeing some other versions if people want to share. I like the single page idea.

  5. ….they don’t have a clue about what I am doing, really….
    This is unfortunately very true. We can’t even think of them as being there to judge us. How can they if they don’t know what we are doing? I just got observed and forgot to give the guy the four page handout, which doesn’t even include this checklist. Among it is the Colorado Leap document Appendix in there, which is posted here:
    https://benslavic.com/blog/leap-document/ (also on the Primer hard link)
    We can’t forget to give them something to read. Otherwise, they are wasting their time in the evaluation. What better chance to re-educate an administrator than when they are actually in our classroom observing us?
    I like the single page idea too. What should we do? New category? Hard link? Let me know and I’ll tell Trevor.

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