ROA Detail

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6 thoughts on “ROA Detail”

  1. I’ve found that it’s often enough to just type up the most important scene of the story. That way there’s less that needs to be typed up, plus it focuses on the most important part. Plus, when you add a few interesting details of your own and some new vocabulary you can spend extra time focusing on that.
    I’ve found reading classes to be fun and relaxing for both me and my students this year. Love it!

  2. I often type up something to read right there in class – maybe we created a scene orally, and then I ask them collectively to retell it while I type it up (which allows me to fix word order and usage as needed, too). An advantage to doing this for Chinese is that I type using the phonetic spelling of the characters, so the students can see that as I type, and then the characters show up. This means they’re getting a nice transition from sound to visual appearance, I think, and they’re seeing what it’s like to type (and what typos are easy to end up with!). We read & discuss it there in class, and it can be turned into something they read and do something else with more independently during the following class (usually doing a little something to modify it or embellish it so it’s not the exact same thing – I can do that in just a few minutes of prep time).
    I need longer readings because of the need for many reps on the new characters. So typing in class is one way to help manage the time needed. I’m aiming for 20+ reps on new characters with the novice – “advanced” classes which all have at least some students who are beginning-level readers. The “applied language” class has much stronger readers on the whole, and they are doing nicely picking up new characters in less targeted, less repetitious reading. They have more context in their minds. I think those kids are all at least Intermediate Low or Mid.
    Another way: type up something shorter, say only 5-6 reps on the new characters, but use it three or four times so I get the 20+ reps on new characters. So we read it together and I ask comprehension questions as we go; second time we read it aloud as a class; third time I ask for “styles” with each sentence (ex, “Should he read it romantically? angrily? loudly?”). Maybe another time some of them act it out as it’s read aloud. That kind of thing. Finding ways to reuse reading, and quickly & easily to modify reading for another time through, without driving students to distraction is my goal.

    1. I have 1 “stories notebook” for all classes and the student job “story writer” writes in L1 or L2 the story there. It probably only takes me 5-10 minutes to type up 1 class story. And since not all classes that day are going to have a step 3 reading class, I may only have 0-2 stories to type up.

  3. I am finding that shorter stories are better. In the past I have had 6-7 paragraph stories and the kids do get tired of reading aloud and answering the same types of questions for all 6-7 paragraphs. I am new to this so I don’t have many tricks up my sleeve, so a lot of what I do is the basic TPRS. It can get mundane throughout the year but it works!
    I can spend a whole class period on 3 paragraphs and then milk it the next day with the acting out, artist retell and possibly some follow up PQA questions either verbally or written (if I need a break).

  4. I just talked to our tech guy about hooking my iPad up to the overhead projector so that I could use the microphone on it in Spanish, and dictate the story in class, and have the spoken text appear up onscreen. Alternatively, volunteer kids could dictate a phrase or sentence, while everyone watches the words resolve. We know from our iPhones that it’s not perfect technology and that autocorrect often gets it wrong, but that’s just an opportunity for more reps!
    I think it’d be a cool way to get the individual stories written up during class.

  5. Alisa what you say there connects to this:
    https://benslavic.com/blog/dealing-with-oppositional-students/
    My only reservation with this very noble reaction to such pain in a child comes in the form of a few questions: “How much can we take?” and “What is the function of a school?” It seems to me that in the U.S. we do so much more on so many other levels for kids, sometimes almost parenting them, and I don’t see that in other countries. The kid would be out. In my view that is the way it should be, and I don’t mean that in a harsh way, just a realistic one, as we become aware here in our group of how deep the suffering of so many teachers is. How much can we really take and what is our real job? I wish I had drawn more clear limits with others (admins and parents) when I was younger. I wish I had chosen better buildings to apply for jobs in, not just the ones closest to my house. I should have been much more aggressive about applying for jobs in good schools where teachers are not worked like mules with too many impossible students.I don’t care if that doesn’t sound very patriotic. How can I serve others if I myself am always burnt out?

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