My New TPRS Rules

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3 thoughts on “My New TPRS Rules”

  1. How about doing SSR only once or twice a week?
    How about doing SSR only once or twice a week and having the kids choose 2 or 3 books that interest them?
    How about doing SSR only once or twice a week and having the kids choose 2 or 3 books that interest them from a well-stocked class library?
    How about doing SSR only once or twice a week and having the kids choose 2 or 3 books that interest them from a well-stocked class library and that are at their level?
    How about doing SSR only once or twice a week and having the kids choose 2 or 3 books that interest them from a well-stocked class library and that are at their level? You could also ask 2 0r 3 kids a month to bring in some other material that they’ve found (internet, public or school library, at home) and would like to contribute to the class collection.
    How about doing SSR only once or twice a week and having the kids choose 2 or 3 books that interest them from a well-stocked class library and that are at their level? You could also ask 2 0r 3 kids a month to bring in some other material that they’ve found (internet, public or school library, at home) and would like to contribute to the class collection. You could also refresh your class collection by rotating books with other language teachers’ collections.
    How about doing SSR only once or twice a week and having the kids choose 2 or 3 books that interest them from a well-stocked class library and that are at their level? You could also ask 2 0r 3 kids a month to bring in some other material that they’ve found (internet, public or school library, at home) and would like to contribute to the class collection. You could also refresh your class collection by rotating books with other language teachers’ collections. How about relaxing with the class on your really busy day, reading quietly, letting the kick ass deans deal with the tardies and getting CI bell to bell?
    Can you tell I’m trying out the embedded reading ideas from Laurie this week?
    A couple ideas that have worked for me.
    Norm

  2. FVR was actually THE thing that converted me to TPRS. Thanks Bryce! Come to think of it, I’m not sure it was FVR, or Bryce… (CCFLT), or just that Bryce did such a kick-butt presentation on FVR and reading aloud to the kids.
    I do FVR at least once every five days (A/B rotation, so I create my own “week” of five days). The kids walk into my room, see that we are doing FVR, and select their book/books . Once the bell rings, and everybody has a seat, we sit down and read for ten minutes. My kids don’t LOVE it, but then one of the most common threads I found in the student surveys was that many of my students do not like reading in English either.
    I don’t do reading logs. I let the kids self-select their reading material. They can read the same material multiple times, they can read different things each week, they can read really easy books, or really difficult books. I don’t moderate the selections (although sometimes if I see a kid struggling, I pull a book off the shelf I think may be easier, and put it on his/her desk.) I would love to let them sit comfortably wherever they wanted, but my classroom, and the school environment don’t allow for that. But, it’s ten minutes of just reading for no other sake than reading. I walk around, reading myself. Right now, i am reading Prince Caspian, the kids are thrilled to notice that I am also reading in Spanish, and many of them are impressed at the “difficult” book I am reading (it’s a young adult novel, not that difficult really, but hey )
    Sometimes I ask them to give me a fist-to-five of how much they understood. Sometimes I have asked them to share something they learned. Tiburón means shark. Derek Jeter played football.

  3. I doubt that Krashen ever said anything like, “Oh, and by the way, just throw in whatever English you need into the CI to keep things going.”
    Nope… he said… (and this is IMPORTANT because it is a SIGNIFICANT change from the original definition of The Natural Approach)….
    Is First Language Use in the Foreign Language Classroom Good or Bad?
    It Depends.
    Dr. Stephen Krashen, http://www.IJFLT.com, Winter, ’06
    Contrary to semi-popular opinion, the Comprehension Hypothesis does not forbid the use of the fi rst language in the second language classroom. It does, however, provide guidelines. It predicts that the use of the first language will
    help second language development if it results in more comprehensible input, and will hurt second language development when it results in less
    comprehensible input.
    Providing Background Knowledge
    The first language helps when it provides background knowledge that functions to make second language input more comprehensible. This
    can happen in several ways: It happens when the first language is used to
    provide background knowledge through discussion or reading. When teachers know that a topic needs to be discussed in class that is unusually complex or unfamiliar, a short presentation or set of readings in the first language can be of great help. A few minutes or a page or two on relevant aspects of the history of
    Mexico, for example, can transform a discussion of Cortez from one that is opaque to one that is transparent. This kind of background is, of course,
    most useful when teachers know that all or nearly all students will require it.
    Bilingual education relies on the same principle: In bilingual programs, students are given background knowledge in the first language in order to make
    subsequent instruction delivered in the second language more comprehensible (Krashen, 1996).
    Is First Language Use in the Foreign Language Classroom
    Good or Bad?
    It Depends.
    The first language can also help when it is used during a lesson as a quick explanation. Comprehension difficulties can arise in unpredictable places
    and students differ in their need for background knowledge. The fi rst language can be used as needed for quick explanations in the middle of discussions
    when some students are having trouble, and when it is not easy to paraphrase and use other means of providing context.
    There is also nothing wrong with providing a quick translation for a problematic word that is central to a discussion. Providing the translation may or may not
    contribute very much to the acquisition of the meaning of the translated word, but it can help make the entire discussion more comprehensible.
    The first language is misused when teachers provide so much information that there is no reason to continue the discussion in the second language.
    It is also misused when teachers provide so many brief explanations and translations that it is difficult to keep track of the message. If this intervention is considered to be necessary, the topic may not be right. It has been hypothesized that the acquirer needs to be so interested in the message (or “lost in the book”) that he or she temporarily “forgets” that the message is in another language. When translations are excessive, the spell is broken.
    Dr. Krashen is professor Emeritus, University of
    Southern California and a published author and
    speaker on second language acquisition, reading and
    bilingual education. http://www.sdkrashen.com.

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