Movie Talk Links

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben's Patreon at $10 or more
Already a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to access this content.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

30 thoughts on “Movie Talk Links”

  1. I’ve probably shared this before somewhere, but in case you missed it, here is a list to the MovieTalks I have done with a link to the clip on YouTube and a link to an accompanying reading.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1EajK__C8PDdj1sE4zdT6mLRdVq__U_XlnSDARSkVqiY/edit

    I use MovieTalk like Step 2 of TPRS. I spend at least 3 fifty minute classes on 1 minute MovieTalk clips. To me, the best clips are those that have repetitive plots, like the 3 scenes/events of a TPRS story script. Then, it is easier to pick 2-3 target structures that keep coming up in the clip. My favorites repetitive MT’s:

    1. iPad vs. Paper: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UR4mlLiyjYo&feature=youtu.be

    2. Wildebeest from BirdBox Studios: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMJXvsCLu6s&feature=youtu.be

    3. Mr. Bean clips are often repetitive, like this one, Mr. Bean Takes the Stairs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWwCj-GPel0&feature=youtu.be

    4. The Force Volkswagen Comercial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R55e-uHQna0&feature=youtu.be

    5. This is longer, but very repetitive and can teach time and daily routines: Destiny: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEKLEeY_WeQ&feature=youtu.be

    6. Fly Guy or any other Simon’s Cat video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1qHVVbYG8Y&feature=youtu.be

    7. I haven’t done this one yet (Messi vs. Kobe), but has potential and is repetitive: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruav0KvQOOg&feature=youtu.be

    8. And of course, Paperman, is longer, but awesome: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSxJkKiHXbw&feature=youtu.be

  2. I do a MT every week. This week, week two with Spanish 1, I did a commercial called First Day of School. It was perfect. I make a keynote with screenshots and use that to circle. I always leave out the ending, so they are surprised. (You should have seen them after Alma, with that surprise ending!) We usually have a quick quiz after and sometimes I make a reading.

    With my recalcitrant Spanish 2 class last semester, by the end of the semester, I wasn’t doing stories anymore, just Movie Talks and novels. They hated stories.

    I’ve used:
    Alma
    The first day of school
    Mr bean videos
    Simon’s cat videos
    The wildebeest short
    A short about a sad man in bed, then birds come to his window, can’t remember the name…
    A three little pigs at Christmas short I found

    I’m sure there are more, I’m on my ipad.

  3. Dennis Gallagher

    This is also a way to get in some authentic video: movie trailers are great for MT.

    For French: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LYOcC-8GxaI or

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kv7P2KDzMOE

    These are both videos with speech. What I usually do is play it through without the sound and ask the students to write down a list of words (French/English doesn’t matter) that they have learned which relate to what they see on the trailer. Then they listen to the French just so they can hear a few words that they know. From that point on, I use Keynote/PP using frames to discuss the story and embedded readings. I find the Keynote easier to operate than pausing/rewinding a video. Of course, some frames provide more discussion than others, so I focus on them.

  4. Sabrina Sebban_Janczak

    Add these to the ever growing list by checking this old post:

    https://benslavic.com/blog/youtube-clips/

    Nina barber (Spanish teacher at DPS) and I will be presenting at CCFLT in two weeks on Movietalk/youtube Talk and I will do a demo of the Youtube clip “Ipad vs paper” , which I also presented at Skip conference this past October.

    I believe this is a great way to break away from stories, especially if you have a hard time with them or if the kids resist them at this time of the year.

    Based on my experience with Youtube as a teaching tool , if I had pieces of advice to give to new teachers using this tool it would be :

    1) Know your audience of kids and try and pick clips that are compelling to their age group, interest and culture (Kyle’s suggestion to google CGI animated shorts is a great one)

    2) Try and pick clips where there is a clear and concrete correspondence between the imagery and the language. So the visual should support rather hinder their listening comprehension. Music clips are not a good tool for listening comprehension in that respect because there is so much subjective imagery in them.

    3) For your beginners try and pick a story that has a somewhat clear chronological narrative. So for example watching pulp fiction is a hard exercise even for a native speaker b/c all the flashbacks, and the going back and forth in time are very hard to follow.

    4) If you do that for the first time, don’t pick a long clip. Practice this art slowly until you get comfortable with this tool.

  5. This didn’t post the first time I tried. It says “Awaiting moderation” ?? So I’ll try and post again, but this time without the http://

    I’ve probably shared this before somewhere, but in case you missed it, here is a list to the MovieTalks I have done with a link to the clip on YouTube and a link to an accompanying reading.

    docs.google.com/document/d/1EajK__C8PDdj1sE4zdT6mLRdVq__U_XlnSDARSkVqiY/edit?usp=sharing

    I use MovieTalk like Step 2 of TPRS. I spend at least 3 fifty minute classes on 1 minute MovieTalk clips. To me, the best clips are those that have repetitive plots, like the 3 scenes/events of a TPRS story script. Then, it is easier to pick 2-3 target structures that keep coming up in the clip. My favorites repetitive MT’s:

    1. iPad vs. Paper: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UR4mlLiyjYo&feature=youtu.be

    2. Wildebeest from BirdBox Studios: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMJXvsCLu6s&feature=youtu.be

    3. Mr. Bean clips are often repetitive, like this one, Mr. Bean Takes the Stairs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWwCj-GPel0&feature=youtu.be

    4. The Force Volkswagen Comercial: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R55e-uHQna0&feature=youtu.be

    5. This is longer, but very repetitive and can teach time and daily routines: Destiny: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wEKLEeY_WeQ&feature=youtu.be

    6. Fly Guy or any other Simon’s Cat video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1qHVVbYG8Y&feature=youtu.be

    7. I haven’t done this one yet (Messi vs. Kobe), but has potential and is repetitive: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruav0KvQOOg&feature=youtu.be

    8. And of course, Paperman, is longer, but awesome: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSxJkKiHXbw&feature=youtu.be

    1. Eric, I just wanted to thank you for posting your list of good Movie Talk shorts. Today I used Simon’s Cat: “TV Dinner”. It turned out to be an excellent short. It’s cute, we can all relate to it (even if we don’t have cats), the story line is very minimal, in fact, the minimalism of it all I think is it’s best feature for serving as a great Movie Talk clip.

      It was great to have this very natural conversation, from student to student, as we talked about this Simon’s Cat clip. I’m looking forward to having conversations like this when we read a chapter book later in the year.

      1. I shelter my vocabulary and target structures now when I do MT. In order to get the repetitions of target structures, it really helps if the plot repeats itself 3+ times.
        I can see how “TV Dinner” would work to teach structures like:
        “wants attention,” “bothers,” “doesn’t leave him alone,” etc.
        Simon’s Cat videos are big hits with my kids, but I’ve seen a lot and I don’t find many to have enough repetition.
        I wonder if teachers would be interested in “MT scripts.” They would be short, 3 structure repetitive scenes (just like a Matava/Tripp script) written in English that correspond to an MT. I already have a lot written in Spanish and would love to write more and make accessible in English. It would be easy to include an “extended/embedded” version. The difference is that there would not be an underlined, storyasked variable, since MT is storytelling, not storyasking.

  6. Recently a la MovieTalk, I have searched using my target structures in YouTube (etc.). Recently that worked very nicely. I search in Chinese and so naturally, Chinese videos come up.

    For “translate” and “can speak a little Mandarin,” I found a cute YouTube video by a Taiwanese mom talking with her adorable 2-year-old son, and another with a Chinese-American guy who filmed himself talking to random strangers in Mandarin at Laguna Beach to see how they’d react. My 8th graders found these highly engaging. I used the clips as language content, but I could also pause & discuss to hit the targets even more & talk with the kids about the video.

  7. Another cute bunch of short animations (about 7 minutes long each) are called Masha i Medved, it’s in Russian, so if you teach Russian, hurrah, but you can turn off the sound. They are absolutely adorable. My daughter and students love them.

  8. Here is a movie talk ppt I created from the trailer for the new film Beauty and the Beast coming out in Germany, based on the french original.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3jpi5oZMfagbFVBaFFCVUtXWmM/edit?usp=sharing

    Any language could use this, except it’s nice to be able to watch the trailer afterwards with the German sound. But, you don’t have to use sound.

    I didn’t write down sentences for each slide because we did this after we read an easy reader version of the story for over a month. So, the students all had lots of vocab to work with already.

  9. Hello everyone!
    I just did my presentation on movie clips and even though the internet set-up would not allow me to show them how to save youtube clips with the “YouTube Downloader” I was able to walk them through a short version of the “Darth Vader Volkswagen” commercial. I think it went ok. I promoted TCI/TPRS as best as I could in the one-hour session.
    I also got to meet Robert Harrell in person and Jason Fritze (spelling?) so I feel like it was a great day!
    Can’t wait to meet everyone in Denver this summer! Keep up the great work here on the blog and in your classrooms 🙂

    Louisa

    1. Hi Ben,
      It’s hard to say how the audience felt…it was only an hour and there were 40+ in a very small room. No one walked out…there were some questions about how I do a 10 point quiz at the end every day and what happens when my students go on to the next level with a teacher who doesn’t teach this way. I got to tell them about the student jobs, etc. and I told them I didn’t really care about what happens when they go on to the next teacher because I am on a mission to let everyone in my district know about TCI/TPRS so that we can ALL get on board! (4 of my colleagues were listening – eek-cringe). Jason jumped on the band-wagon there to help out and reminded everyone that grammar based methods are not the way to go!
      I reiterated the “slow” idea and making everything comprehensible…Robert piggy-backed on that for me. Jason also did a couple of “amens” which helped!
      I had a great “resource” hand-out that listed your website and blog, Eric’s site, Bryce Hedstrom,Bryan Kandel, and a couple of others that I visit regularly. I also had permission from Bryce to use his story about the Spanish student whose teacher tried to only speak in Spanish from his “Conversational Spanish” book. It is hilarious and sooooooo true! I used it as a warm-up for them to read and a couple of people said that was “great!”.
      I am not one to worry about what is done…what is done is done…but I know that I could have done a better job and would have loved to have had more time for questions at the end.

      Like someone else said on a recent post here, I feel empowered to help spread the word because of the support and comments that you give us here. There is no going back!!

      Louisa

  10. Louisa thank you for those comments. I love it. I can’t believe you had two gods in there in Robert and Jason. Wow. You are to be congratulated for what sounds to have been a great effort. I don’t think that the PhD by your name hurt anything. I’m feelin’ it. Good on you, girl! There is nothing like a little courage in this world, and I also love the way you clearly let it go when it was done.

    I once asked Susan Gross what percentage of teachers she thought actually went on to do this kind of teaching after attending one of her trainings. She said that one out of a hundred try it, and out of one hundred of those who may try it, one may make it their way of teaching. And yet she went on presenting over many years, undaunted, because she has a kind of class and commitment that are without parallel anywhere in language education, in my opinion. Without Susie, I would be selling insurance right now or something – I truly mean that.

    So you probably truly reached only one maybe two of the people in there. That’s how this works. Ours is not to convince the world, ours is to keep calm and go to work again the next day with our hearts open to the beauty of this work, and with our senses of humor ready to be honed a bit more, as we learn to appreciate our children’s genius again one more day. We are not in charge, we are the foot soldiers.

    Again, congrats on this excellent work. Now go do it again somewhere.

    1. Ben,
      You are so kind and positive in your comments! It means a lot to have you be so supportive! I was a little nervous when I realized they were both in the room 🙂

      Thanks again,
      Louisa

    2. Robert Harrell

      Louisa did a great job. I was sitting in the back and could see that everyone was interested and engaged. There were very few empty seats. Louisa helped me get a better handle on “Video Clip Talk”. Thanks, Louisa!

      She also came to one of my workshops, so I got to meet her when she wasn’t being mobbed by the teachers who wanted to know more.

      1. Robert,

        I enjoyed your session, too! It was fun to see how you do the reader’s theater and I can picture your students really enjoying it!
        Thank you for supporting me at my session and I hope to see you again soon. Maybe at a COACH workshop?

        Louisa

    3. Without Susan Gross, you’d be selling insurance, you say. Well, Ben, without you and the professional learning community you’ve built here, I’d be… I don’t know… I can’t imagine but I would probably be seriously looking for another career too.

  11. Thank you Sean. With that short personal observation from you, 37 years of what at the time felt like sheer futility have been balanced out. 37 years balanced out in what took 10 seconds to read. Weird but ever so welcome to read!

  12. Robert Harrell

    Germany has/had a program called “Die Sendung mit der Maus”. It’s a children’s program that includes vignettes of a little over a minute in length. They feature a rather large mouse, a small blue/purple elephant and a pink rabbit. There is no speech, but there are sound effects, and the elephant and rabbit have “voices” without words. Here is a link to sets of vignettes on YouTube.

    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=die+Sendung+mit+der+maus

  13. Robert, these are a gold mine. I only looked at one, but it gave me an idea I’d like to try out.

    The one I saw has the rabbit and elephant under a tree. The video is about leaves “falling” and “falling on someone”–a construction in Spanish thought of as–difficult. This video is so limited in scope, repetitive, but cute (compelling) and short enough not to lose the class. It would be a great way to introduce the structure “it falls on (him/her/them)” a la MovieTalk.

    From there, I could PQA or launch into a story with this structure. Using this to start the acquisition of this structure would be much more memorable than me just writing on the board with a translation.

    Looking forward to viewing more of these. Thank you.

Leave a Comment

  • Search

Get The Latest Updates

Subscribe to Our Mailing List

No spam, notifications only about new products, updates.

Related Posts

Stendra Super Force generico all’ingrosso

Stendra Super Force generico all’ingrosso Valutazione 4.6 sulla base di 352 voti. Nome del prodotto: Stendra Super Force Categoria: Disfunzione Erettile Nome commerciale: Extra Super

The Problem with CI

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

CI and the Research (cont.)

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

$10

~PER MONTH

Subscribe to be a patron and get additional posts by Ben, along with live-streams, and monthly patron meetings!

Also each month, you will get a special coupon code to save 20% on any product once a month.

  • 20% coupon to anything in the store once a month
  • Access to monthly meetings with Ben
  • Access to exclusive Patreon posts by Ben
  • Access to livestreams by Ben