Anne Matava

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben's Patreon at $10 or more
Already a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to access this content.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn

9 thoughts on “Anne Matava”

  1. Looovvvve this story!
    Monday morning, sixth grade, first day back after Spring Break. Works for me.
    Personally, I don’t like “talking about what we did over vacation or over the weekend”. Been teaching too long or something. It’s like dead lead–and heaven forbid, a kid did nothing. The big yakkers take over and show off. I’d rather do a story–evens the playing field a bit the way I see it.
    Hey, maybe the story could be about the kid “who doesn’t go anywhere over Spring Break” AND “can’t go out–(is grounded)” or about the kid “who goes to the Bahamas over Spring Break and “can’t go out”–even more depressing. Hmmm. They’ll love it!

  2. Jody we think alike. Monday shooting the breeze doesn’t work for me – something false about it. I really don’t care what they did. And either does that whole thing about FVR at the lower levels as per the strong and clear comment you made here on that topic about five days ago.
    It’s great that what we do is an ocean of options and we can pick what we want to do in our classes, with never near enough time to do it all, with language just being created as if by magic everywhere. TPRS is a moveable feast.

  3. Smartest thing I ever did–using this story today. OMG, what fun! After the story, when my first sixth-grade class was leaving, they couldn’t actually get out the door. So many of them were busy telling everyone in the next class about the story we had just done and clogged the door. Then, the second class started asking me about things the first class had said and, of course, I had to feign total ignorance of anything they mentioned to me. I told them not to believe one word that they had heard from the other class.
    The second class is more blurty and non compliant as a group. As they got into the story, they got excited and started blurting out. It made it really hard to proceed. We got derailed a few times and my patience began to wear quite thin. Thank God those rules are HUGE up on the wall. I remembered to look at them. I remembered how important they are to the success of circling and detail monging.
    Side note: I think my meditation is paying off. 🙂 As my ire began to bubble to the surface, I found my self breathing into my belly and quieting my irritated mind. When I redirected them, I didn’t speak. I opened my mouth as if I were speaking, but without sound, gesturing very clearly what I noticed was not working and then, what behavior would make it work. Lots of smiling, lots of thumbs up. They paid total attention, laughed, and quieted down. I felt better and they didn’t feel so balled out. (That wasn’t working. Duh.)
    Their ability to respond in the TL is quite good at this point, so they all want to speak at once. (What a terrible problem I have! Ha!) May I say that Anne Matava understands the psyche of the American adolescent male quite well? They were completely outside of themselves, totally unaware that anything was happening in Spanish; they were so into the story. My girls participated well as usual, but the boy energy was over the top on this one.
    This story structure really helped me slow down and CIRCLE. Sometimes I forget and just race to the detail monging. The kids really need sufficient repetition of these structures in context, if we want to move them from “aural comprehension” to “oral expression”.
    Thanks Anne and Ben. It was a good first day back.

  4. This is a little long but I don’t know how to attach files. Maybe some of you could use these.
    I used this story with my classes on Monday. Thank you Anne! The stories went okay, no home runs (probably because I was too controlling again) but students said they were understanding almost everything. I found a news story about a girl in New York who created a Facebook advocacy group to try to get her parents to lift her punishment. I copied the article, in two versions for my beginning and more advanced classes. We had a discussion of this article in my classes today. This was the first time in weeks that my advanced French class managed to discuss a single topic, together, without going off on individual tangents! I am thrilled. Gave them a quiz on content of the article after class, and they did GREAT. They said, “We should do topics like this all the time.” (Okay, give me another few hours to put together some more news articles!)
    Here they are:
    For Spanish 2-4:
    Facebook no le ayuda con su castigo
    Tess Chapin, de quince años de edad, vive en la ciudad de Nueva York. Este enero, ella fue castigada por sus padres. Por cinco semanas no podía salir. Nada de fiestas, de bailes, ni de amigas o amigos para compartir su soledad.
    Pero la chica creyó que cinco semanas era demasiado por lo que había hecho. Qué hizo Tess para estar castigada? Mientras estaba en una fiesta decidió tomar una cerveza y después llegar un poco tarde a su casa (una hora después de la hora en que debía llegar). Por qué cinco semanas? Su padre quería que fueran 3 meses, y la madre sólo un mes, así que cinco semanas parecían lógicas para un acuerdo.
    Tess pensaba que si sus padres la castigaran sólo por eso, era loco. Así que decidió crear un grupo en Facebook: “1,000 to get tess ungrounded” o “1,000 (personas) para que descastiguen a tess”. Cuando su madre le preguntó cuál era el propósito del grupo ella contestó “Volverlos tan locos que me quitarán mi castigo”, a lo que su madre respondió “Eso no va a suceder, cariño”.
    Tess recibió muchas respuestas en su grupo. Algunos le dijeron de salir de su casa. Otros le dieron sus expresiones de solidaridad. Pero la gran mayoría eran para hacerle ver que si sus padres la castigaron es porque se preocupan por ella. Es por eso que ella ha decidido aceptar su destino y no protestar más contra el castigo.
    Algunos comentarios sobre su situación:
    “Si tus padres no te quisieran, ellos no te hubieran castigada.”
    “Sí, los padres pueden ser estúpidos.”
    “Te quiero, pero tus padres no van a quitarte el castigo por tener un grupo en Facebook.”
    “Yo estaba castigada muchas veces también. Mis padres me escondían todos los zapatos para que yo no salga por la ventana.”
    “Necesitas un poco de perspectiva. Tus padres te aman, y por eso te castigan.”
    For Spanish I:
    Facebook no le ayuda con su castigo
    Tess Chapin es una chica que tiene quince años. Ella vive en la ciudad de Nueva York. En enero, Tess hizo algo estúpido. Ella decidió de ir a una fiesta. A la fiesta, Tess bebió cerveza. Después, ella no regresó a casa a tiempo. Regresó una hora tarde. Sus padres no estaban felices con ella. Ellos estaban enojados. Sus padres le dijeron, “Tess, tú estás castigada por cinco semanas.” Por cinco semanas no podía salir. Nada de fiestas, de bailes, ni de amigas o amigos para compartir su soledad. Tess estaba frustrada porque estaba castigada.
    Tess pensaba que cinco semanas era demasiado por llegar una hora tarde, y por beber un poco de cerveza. Por qué cinco semanas? Al principio, su padre quería que fueran 3 meses, y la madre sólo un mes, así que cinco semanas parecían lógicas para un acuerdo.
    Tess pensaba que era loco. Así que ella decidió crear un grupo en Facebook: “1,000 to get tess ungrounded” o “1,000 (personas) para que descastiguen a tess”. Cuando su madre le preguntó por qué ella formó el grupo ella contestó “Ahora ustedes van a quitarme el castigo.” Su madre le respondió, “Lo siento, Tess, no va a marchar.”
    Tess recibió muchas respuestas en su grupo. Algunos le dijeron de salir de su casa. Otros le dieron sus expresiones de solidaridad. Pero la gran mayoría le dijeron que si sus padres la castigaron es porque se preocupan por ella. Por eso, ella ha decidido aceptar su destino y no protestar más contra el castigo.
    Algunos comentarios sobre su situación:
    “Sí, los padres pueden ser estúpidos.”
    “Te quiero, amiga, pero tus padres no van a quitarte el castigo por tener un grupo en Facebook.”
    “Yo estaba castigada muchas veces también. Mis padres me escondían todos los zapatos para que yo no salga por la ventana.”
    “Necesitas un poco de perspectiva. Tus padres te quieren, y por eso te castigan.”
    For French 3-4:
    Privée de sortie ? Comment faire avec les parents trop sévères…
    Elle n’a pas aimé se faire punir par ses parents. Le meilleur moyen pour cette jeune fille de lever la punition ? Facebook !
    Tess Chapin, une Américaine de la ville de New York, a15 ans. En janvier, elle a été privée de sortie par ses parents pendant cinq semaines. Cinq semaines, c’est le compromis de ses parents. Son père avait voulu qu’elle soit punie pour trois mois, et sa mère a dit un mois.
    Son crime? Être rentrée trop tard d’une soirée et avoir bu de l’alcool… aussi, est est arrivée chez elle une heure après l’heure prévue. Tess n’était pas d’accord avec sa punition. Donc, elle a eu l’idée de se créer un groupe de Facebook pour recruter au moins 1 000 membres et ainsi inciter ses parents à lever la punition!
    Elle a écrit sur son Facebook : “Alors en gros, j’ai été punie de sortie pour cinq semaines pour une ERREUR dont je ne connaissais pas tous les tenants et les aboutissants. Mes parents ont paniqué et m’ont punie pour cinq SEMAINES. C’est mon enfance qui est en jeu. S’il vous plaît, rejoignez ce groupe pour que je puisse les convaincre de lever la punition. SVP, SVP, SVP. Vous tous, vous savez ce que c’est que d’être un adolescent avec (parfois) des parents difficiles, alors protestons tous ensemble pour prouver quelque chose à mes parents, qui font n’importe quoi.”
    Trop dure la vie ! Mais même si, maintenant, elle a dépassé les 1 000 membres, ses parents, eux, n’ont pas cédé. «Désolée, chérie, mais ça ne marchera pas, » lui a dit sa mère. Elle a décidé enfin de ne plus protester sa punition.
    Quelques commentaires sur son destin :
    « Tu es punie parce que tes parents ont du souci pour toi. S’ils ne t’aimaient pas, ils t’auraient laissé faire. »
    « Pourquoi ne t’ont-ils pas aussi enlevé l’usage de l’internet ? »
    « Mes parents m’ont privée de sortie aussi. Ils me prenaient toutes les chaussures pour que je ne sorte pas par la fenêtre. »
    « Arrête de pleurnicher et remercie tes parents pour avoir le courage de vivre avec toi pendant ces cinq semaines sans sortie. »
    « Tu as besoin de perspective ! Ce que tu as fait est mauvais, et illégal. Prends ta punition et tais-toi ! »
    « Tu as raison. Tes parents sont trop sévères. Tu devrais quitter la maison et vivre avec une autre famille. »
    « La prochaine fois, fais attention qu’on ne t’atrappes pas. »
    And for French I:
    Facebook n’aide pas avec sa punition…
    Tess Chapin est une Américaine de la ville de New York. Elle a quinze ans. En janvier, elle a fait quelque chose de bête. Elle a décidé d’aller à une soirée. À la soirée, elle a bu de la bière. Puis, elle est arrivée chez elle une heure en retard. Bien sûr, ses parents n’étaient pas du tout contents. Ils l’ont privée de sortie pendant cinq semaines. Cinq semaines, c’est le compromis de son père et de sa mère. Lui, il avait voulu qu’elle soit punie pour trois mois, et elle, elle a dit un mois. Alors ils ont décidé que cinq semaines seraient une punition juste.
    Tess n’était pas d’accord avec sa punition. Donc, elle a décidé de former un groupe de Facebook pour recruter 1 000 membres et convaincre ses parents à lever la punition!
    Elle a écrit sur son Facebook : “J’ai été punie de sortie pour cinq semaines pour une ERREUR … Mes parents ont paniqué et m’ont punie pour cinq SEMAINES. C’est mon enfance qui est en jeu. S’il vous plaît, rejoignez ce groupe pour que je puisse les convaincre de lever la punition. SVP, SVP, SVP. Vous tous, vous savez ce que c’est que d’être un adolescent avec (parfois) des parents difficiles, alors protestons tous ensemble pour prouver quelque chose à mes parents, qui font n’importe quoi.”
    Trop dure la vie ! Maintenant, son groupe a plus de 1 000 membres, mais ses parents, eux, n’ont pas changé leur décision. «Désolée, chérie, mais ça ne marchera pas, » lui a dit sa mère. Et Tess a décidé enfin de ne plus protester sa punition. Elle a fini les cinq semaines sans soirées, sans aller au cinéma, et sans la compagnie de ses amis après l’école.
    Quelques commentaires sur son destin à Facebook:
    « Tu es punie parce que tes parents pensent que tu est importante. Les parents qui n’aiment pas leurs enfants ne les punissent pas. »
    « Pourquoi ne t’ont-ils pas aussi privée de l’usage de l’internet ? »
    « Mes parents m’ont privée de sortie aussi. Ils me cachaient toutes les chaussures pour que je ne sorte pas par la fenêtre. »
    « Arrête de pleurnicher et remercie tes parents pour avoir le courage de vivre avec toi pendant ces cinq semaines sans sortie. »
    « Tu as besoin de perspective ! Ce que tu as fait est mauvais, et illégal. Prends ta punition et tais-toi ! »
    « Tu as raison. Tes parents sont trop sévères. Tu as besoin de quitter la maison et vivre avec une autre famille. »
    « La prochaine fois, fais attention qu’on ne t’atrappes pas. »

  5. Oops, opportunities for a couple of grammar fixes in there in a couple of places. Sorry about the typos in French. I am such a grammar nerd, there they are glaring at me and it bugs me. Sorry.

  6. Hi Jennie, I reworked your Spanish one a bit for my kids and am looking forward to using it tomorrow with my classes. I like this “real world” tie in after the story. I believe that they will like it a lot, too. Thanks. I’ll let you know how it went over.

  7. Funny because Susie was just talking about this at lunch today with me and Thomas. Non-fiction, real life stuff. Like you said Jennie –
    They said, “We should do topics like this all the time.”
    This topic of non-fiction CI is just being touched upon lightly by all of us right now, but it won’t be a light topic later. TPRS won’t be associated with just silly stories, but with much more. It will become a very heavy topic.
    What I got from Susie today is a vision of non-fiction through all four levels, of course, but really hitting meaningful non-fiction, i.e. less silly stories, at the upper levels. That is to say that silliness is a great way to get CI patterning into our kids’ heads at the lower level, but not at the upper levels. There, we need stuff like what you describe above Jennie – stuff that is real and meaningful to them, stuff that makes them say (worth repeating):
    They said, “We should do topics like this all the time.”
    Jennie this is a marvelous post. It is a view into the future. Facebook.
    Benny

  8. This is truly a great story. My adults used it the other night to tell how one of their kids was grounded for biting her sister, and various kids came to the window to get her to run away with them. Then today, when kids were just tired of life and projects, they asked whether I could tell them a TPRS story. We had a hilarious time having Brittany (of the show Glee) get grounded for calling dolphins “blue sharks” so that various cast members came to her window to offer her ways to get out. Finally the director came, in a red Ferrari, and drove her to Africa, where a blue shark ate her. Like someone said about time in a post earlier today, the class started, we sang a little bit, and then got the story going. Suddenly the 80-minute period was done. Over. I swear someone took the clock hands and turned them around.

Leave a Comment

  • Search

Get The Latest Updates

Subscribe to Our Mailing List

No spam, notifications only about new products, updates.

Related Posts

The Problem with CI

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

CI and the Research (cont.)

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

Research Question

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

We Have the Research

To view this content, you must be a member of Ben’s Patreon at $10 or more Unlock with PatreonAlready a qualifying Patreon member? Refresh to

$10

~PER MONTH

Subscribe to be a patron and get additional posts by Ben, along with live-streams, and monthly patron meetings!

Also each month, you will get a special coupon code to save 20% on any product once a month.

  • 20% coupon to anything in the store once a month
  • Access to monthly meetings with Ben
  • Access to exclusive Patreon posts by Ben
  • Access to livestreams by Ben