Curriculum – 2

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10 thoughts on “Curriculum – 2”

  1. In my credential program the term “S and S” was mainly used by colleagues in elementary. The curriculum would come from collaborating with other teachers.

    In my experience, different districts do things differently. Because of the wild variation of what students have acquired, most teachers are given wiggle room, as long as departments agree. The is still curriculum and an admin can ask for it but admin worries more about English and Math. High Stakes testing is what they care about.

    It probably not a good experience to be the only teacher in a dept teaching TPRS/CI. I’m doing ok because I am the only French teacher.

    I have a colleague where he has to give district mandated tests that cover the book. He’s a newbie and I want him out of that oppressive district.

    1. Scope and Sequence is used in middle and high as well. The problem with curriculum mapping or vertical/horizontal alignment is that you lose focus on the kids. It’s good to collaborate with colleagues, especially last year’s teacher bringing you your kids from French I to your French II class or whatever. Mostly to find out more about the kids, establishing baseline data or sharing assessments (maybe they can give you a writing sample or talk about student interests or concerns. But not for the purpose of mapping in advance: I will cover A, B,C so I can hand them to you in the next level and force you to ”cover” X, Y, Z.

      Scope and Sequence (when used appropriately) can force teachers to stay within what is developmentally appropriate for a given ability level without the pressure to ”align” to vertical standards, only align to assessments of where kids are at. I know many teachers misunderstand this, but we’ll get them on board.

      1. Steven Ordiano

        Claire, when you mention the x y z, that is what i hear from older veteran teachers and its sad that they are training the newbies in my region.

        Thanks for your s and s explanation. Ive only heard the term never read or experienced it.

  2. Alisa Shapiro

    Take a look at the WL KUDs from my district (Winnetka) in the Curriculum hard links above. We were given the template and had to work within it. It’s all based on hi-freq words. Some is backward planned from Brandon etc but that’s all hi-freq too. We put some language functions in there for the D in KUD (Knows, Understands, Does). I think this combined w/Claire’s kick-ass modified WIDA doc and her other rubrics can be mined for lots of great ideas, specifics and language…

  3. What the…!?

    I got a tip that “let’s take a break” didn’t really mean “let’s take a break.” No kidding! There are tens of new posts and tens (hundreds?) of replies since I thought just 7 days ago that everyone was taking it easy over the summer. For the record, I’d like to participate in the iFLT assessment discussion. Even if I don’t use the assessments that are developed, I can certainly help in their design. The people have spoken, and the people want rubrics, etc.. I can help with that.

    Anyway, at this point in trying to catch up to 7 days worth of activity, I’m not convinced I’ll feel better resting if I’m so out of the loop. Resting really just means more Facebook, Yahoo Groups, and ACTFL Community Discussion (ugh). My TESOL program starts next week, which naturally will curb my own presence here, but before it does I should remind folks of the “New Curriculum Map” Ben has in the “Shared Curriculum Docs” tab: (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1vHZ8hdXktVY8BBh8UFQJu3V6nkAEPVU0F5hZ25VtZ74/edit?usp=sharing)

    Maybe it was lost in the shuffle just before the May madness? Maybe people hate it? I’m not sure. But it’s there, and it’s comprised of high-frequency vocabulary exactly like the S & S (Scope & Sequence) Diana describes above. If that appeals to you, it could save a lot of work otherwise reinventing.

    In anticipation of some other curricula needs, when talking with John Piazza we originally wanted very specific structures/phrases. After working on a preliminary version, it seemed too limiting, and looked more and more like the documents we were trying to avoid. Our texts should drive specific structures, and our students should drive the topics we read about as texts. That’s why the New Curriculum Map has *suggested* topics, and *example* structures/phrases. If we, indeed, listen to our kids, the structures/phrases will change slightly based on what interests them, though are rooted in high-frequency verbs. Hopefully I’ve created a template that works for everyone (i.e. just change your verbs based on frequency/importance). Thus, the curriculum documents (S & S or however they are termed) for modern languages might be better left as open-ended as possible, yet still on some kind of “track” to help admin/others see what we’re doing.

    Kevin Ballestrini uses the term “sandbox on rails,” which I think is totally apt for this.

    1. Steven Ordiano

      Thanks lance for the analogy. Admin really does need tracks, I understand that. For me, gathering some evidence here and there can be helpful as well.

    2. Steven Ordiano

      Lance your doc is well grounded in sla principles and is well articulated. i like how you differentiate between the teaching of other subjects and our work. I can see alot of BVP in it as well. Could I adapt it for my French instruction?

        1. Steven Ordiano

          That’s right! You taught Spanish. Yes, Ill email you it. Your vids were awesome, btw. Here are mine, I already sent them to Ben but it’s hectic these days:

          The youtube videos are unlisted but anyone with the link can view them. 7th/8th grade French 1. Untargeted story.

          Les biscuits part 1
          https://youtu.be/UeagfjVGLrQ

          Les biscuits part 2

          https://youtu.be/SV2yd-NJU-E

          Les biscuits part 3

          https://youtu.be/rIabGSDybSQ

          Les biscuits part 4

          https://youtu.be/owGgxXI3KHU

          PS I know I need a haircut badly.

    3. “Thus, the curriculum documents (S & S or however they are termed) for modern languages might be better left as open-ended as possible, yet still on some kind of “track” to help admin/others see what we’re doing.”

      I’m so glad we agree on this, Lance.

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